‘Abortion skills’ training for medics prompts concerns for pro-life students

Christian Today

Staff Writer

The Christian Institute has raised concerns about the right to conscientious objection after the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG) said it would teach and assess “abortion skills”. 

In its ‘Better for Women’ document, the RCOG is calling on the General Medical Council (GMC) to “review the Undergraduate medical curriculum to include the importance of abortion care to students”. . .

The RCOG added it would “teach abortion skills as a part of its core curriculum and assess those skills through examination”. . . [Full text]

Medical schools should deny applicants who object to provide abortion, assisted death: bioethicist

Global News

Rachel Browne

A bioethicist is calling for medical schools to eliminate applicants who would oppose providing medical services over objections to them based on their personal beliefs.

The call from Udo Schuklenk, a Queen’s University professor and the Ontario Research Chair in Bioethics, comes as the Alberta government grappled with a controversial bill that would have allowed health-care providers to refuse to provide medical care if they object to it on religious or moral grounds. . . [Full text]

New doctors needing a medical residency in Canada face ‘match day’ with few available spots

Star Vancouver

Alex McKeen

VANCOUVER—Thirty-three medical residency positions the Ontario government created last April with a $23-million commitment were a one-time deal and are not on offer to 2019 medical graduates, according to the province’s Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care.

The funding was an attempt by the previous Liberal government to decrease the number of Ontario medical graduates going without work while people need doctors. . .

. . .For the last 10 years, as the number of medical students has gone up and the number of residency spots has stagnated, more and more Canadian medical graduates have not secured residency spots. . . [Full text]

How to be an Odd Doc Without Getting Your Goose Cooked

Dan Reilly

A presentation at a medical students’ forum hosted by Canadian Physicians for Life.

2:38 – 4:12  Ethical disputes: disagreeing about an “ought”

4:12 –  11:22  World views: dominant culture, ethics, law, decision making processes, religion, society, culture, experience, philosophy

11:22 – 13:58  The patient wants what you will not provide: ct scan, antibiotics, opioids, abortion, life support, contraception, pre-natal genetic tests, CPR, plastic surgery, elective C-sections, elective induction of labour

13:58 – 1834  fiduciary duty, patient access, moral distress

18:34 – 19:43  When patient asks for what you would like to provide, but can’t

19:43 –  21:44  When professional consensus is that you should say no

21:44 – 25:22  When physicians differ on what fiduciary duty dictates: full information, no abandonment

25:22 – 27:18  In some jursidictions, when refusing on moral grounds, in emergencies – provide service; otherwise- effective referral

27:18 –  32:55 Odd Docs and patients: why disputes arise, best practices: communication, compassion, care, honesty

32:55 – 36:24  Odd Docs and administrators: communication, compassion, do other work

Answering Physicians’ Top 5 Legal Questions

In 2017, the medical students’ forum hosted by Canadian Physicians for Life included a question and answer session about legal issues. Albertos Polizogopoulos is lead counsel in the constitutional challenge to the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario (CPSO) policy that demands effective referral for all morally contested services, including euthanasia and assisted suicide.  Phil Horgan, a Toronto lawyer, is President of the Catholic Civil Rights League, which jointly intervened in the case with the Faith and Freedom Alliance and Protection of Conscience Project.  Questions have been listed below with the corresponding time segments.  Links have been provided to background material concerning subjects covered in the answers.

1. How can physicians best disclose to their patients their conscientious objections?  (00:00-11:18)

2. What happens when a patient reports a physician to their college for exercising their right to conscientious objection?  (11:18-20:00)

3. How can conscience and religious rights be exercised, practically speaking?  (20:00-23:33)

4. Is there a sense that other provinces are just waiting to see what is going to happen with these current cases going on in Ontario? (23:33-34:35)

5. Can you comment on institutions?  Do they have rights themselves?   (34:45-40:15)